These Beautiful Places in Kashmir on Other Side of LoC Will Mesmerise You

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The paradise on earth, Kashmir, is divided by the Line of Control, and although we know a lot and have visited several parts in the India-administered Kashmir, we know very little about what’s on the other side of the LoC.
Scroll Droll has gathered some pictures that are bound to mesmerise you and leave you spellbound.

Upper Hunza Gilgit

Situated at an elevation of 2,438 meters, Upper Hunza, Gilgit, is a mountainous valley in Gilgit–Baltistan. Several high peaks rise above 6,000 meters in the Hunza valley. The valley provides views of several tall mountains, including Rakaposhi, Ultar Sar, and Bojahagur Duanasir II.

Upper-Hunza-Gilgit

Taobat

Taobat is a village in Neelam Valley, Pakistan. It is the place from where Kishenganga river enters Kashmir and becomes River Neelum.

taobat

Lake Saif ul Malook

Lake Saif ul Malook is a famous tourist spot. The lake is famous for being home to the large size Brown Trout fish, which weigh up to seven kilograms. Lake Saif ul Malook also provides a marvelous view of Malika Parbat, which is the highest peak of the Kaghan Valley.

Lake-Saif-ul-Malook

Naltar Valley
Naltar is a valley near Gilgit. Naltar is a forested village known for its wildlife and magnificent mountain scenery. One can go skiing in the Naltar valley.
Naltar-Valley

Neelum Valley
The valley is a 144 km long bow-shaped thickly forested region. It is named after the Neelum River that flows through the length of the valley.
Neelum-Valley

Passu, Gilgit

Passu is a small village near the Karakoram Highway about 150 km upriver from Gilgit. It lies near the Passu Glacier, and just south of the Batura Glacier. The latter is the seventh longest non-polar glacier in the world at 56 km.

Passu,-Gilgit

Payee Meadows

Located at a height of almost 9500 feet, the Payee meadows are surrounded by the Mallika mountain peak of Kashmir.

Paye-Meadows

Satpara Lake – Skardu, Gilgit-Baltistan

Satpara Lake is a natural lake near Gilgit. Being easily accessible makes the lake a common picnic spot for locals.

Satpara-Lake---Skardu,-Gilgit-Baltistan

Skardu Valley

This valley sees the confluence of the Indus and Shigar Rivers. The town is considered a gateway to the eight-thousanders of the Karakoram Mountain range. The town is located on the Indus river, which separates the Karakoram Range from the Himalayas.

Skardu

Swat Valley

This river valley, which was historically known as Uddyana (garden), is a place of great natural beauty and is popular with tourists. Queen Elizabeth II called it the ‘Switzerland of the east’ when she paid a visit to the valley. The name Swat is derived from Suvastu which stood for river Swat in the ancient times. The river Suvastu is mentioned in the Rigveda.

Swat-Valley

Dudipatsar lake

Dudipatsar Lake or Dudipat Lake is a lake encircled by snow clad peaks in Lulusar-Dudipatsar National Park. The word ‘dudi’ means white, ‘pat’ means mountains and ‘sar’ means lake.
This name has been given to the lake because of the white color of snow at surrounding peaks. In summer the water of the lake reflects like a mirror.

dudipatsar-lake

Deosai Plateau

The Deosai National Park is located in between Skardu, Gultari, Kharmang and Astore Valley, in Gilgit-Baltistan. Deosai means ‘the land of Giants’ in Urdu. The Deosai Plains are one of the highest plateaus in the world.

deosai-plateau

Ratti Gali Lake, Neelum Valley

The lake, at the height of 12,130 feet, is fed by the surrounding glacier waters of the mountains. The snowclad way to the lake is often described as ‘breathtaking’.

Ratti-Gali-Lake,-Neelum-Valley

When we saw these surreal images, we realised how nature has no boundaries and how a sheer manmade boundary can deny people of the amazing beauty mother nature holds.

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